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everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
me. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. ♪ fly me to the moon >> in september they bid well to a modern day columbus. >> neil armstrong was a testament to all americans of what can be achieved through vision and dedication. >>neil: the eulogy for the first man on the moon delivered by the last to leave it captures the spirit of all those who made that journey. ♪ let me see what spring is like on jupiter and mars ♪ >>neil: american heroes whose final mission ended 40 years ago. i am neil cavuto reporting from the kennedy space center in florida. it is hard for people my age to believe that most americans were not alive the last time a man walked on the moon, apollo 17 astronaut on december 14, 1972, a number of the explorers who made the trip passed away and the rest are in their late 70's and some 80 but the story sounds like something from the future, not the past. it is a story about how america was a combination of vision, high-tech know how and good old fashioned courage answered the challenge of a rival, ste
, in -- if china ever collapsed and america would have a major problem dealing with that. so u.s. policy has always been during world war ii to keep china as one of the big four. so elevated the place. in reality because of logistical problems, because of strategic priority, as i say europe first, china second, it was pretty low. one very good indicator was our -- [inaudible] you. over 60% is commonwealth countries. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what t
weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conversation after break. [break] amy goodman: the morehouse college glee club performing "we shall overcome." morehouse college was the alma mater of dr. martin luther king jr. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman, as i continue with my interview with democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia, leader of the civil rights movement, risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote. during the civil rights movement, he marched side by side with dr. king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize t
a bygone america who doesn't have anything to say to the voters who are going to make up our winning margin, but just to wrap that big thing back around, the 47%, romney did more -- all that have damage had been done by how obama team painted him. and then romney came out -- >> and then romney talked. >> with his own words, revealed in september, seemingly and vividly confirming in his own words through his own mouth caught on videotape, all of the worst stereotypes and kas caricatures. >> jonathan capehart, i mean, 47% we focus on that, we forget this is a guy that gets -- the greatest hits for democratic ad makers. i like firing people. do you remember that one? ten others just like that. he won a big victory in florida and the next morning go on a cable news show and say something equally shocking. >> i'm not concerned about the very poor. >> i'm not concerned about the very poor. >> yeah. for me, the 47% video was so -- i mean, it was shocking in its brutal honesty but also how he was able to deride half the country. literally half the kcountry he said, well, i don't have to worry about
>>> good morning, america. >> reporter: snow and record rains around the country, causing a massive travel mess on christmas even. tornados forecast if the south. sam is here with all you need to know to get home for the holidays. >>> the cop who plunged into the icy water to save a woman. his bullet-proof vest threatening to bring him down. >>> and wheel of misfortune. fans are calling their favorite show a scrooge, for denying this woman a win. is a game show gift of giving on the way? >>> and down to the wire. the last minute rush is on. round the clock shopping to get all those gifts. we'll tell you where to get the last minute secret deals to delight everyone on your list. >>> and a good monday morning to you, america. which is also to say, a happy and merry christmas eve. george and robin both celebrating the holiday with their families. glad to have amy robach, paula faris here. >> thank you, everyone. we have so many stories to tell you this morning. including the surprising story of this woman. she's accused of being, we're not making this up, too sexy for her job. her boss
minute secret deals to delight everyone on your list. >>> and a good monday morning to you, america. which is also to say, a happy and merry christmas eve. george and robin both celebrating the holiday with their families. glad to have amy robach, paula faris here. >> thank you, everyone. we have so many stories to tell you this morning. including the surprising story of this woman. she's accused of being, we're not making this up, too sexy for her job. her boss said she was too distracting and was actually threatening his marriage. she's the one who lost her job, not him. >>> we have great news to share with everybody. the best news of all. sam champion, everybody, getting married over the weekend. >> thank you. >> to rubem robierb, now rubem robierb-champion. it was the most beautiful ceremony. and robin looks fantastic. >> how does your hand feel? heavier today in. >> it feels odd. you have to get used to it, right? it takes how long? >> 15 years. give or take a few. >> seriously, congratulations. >> congratulations, we love you, and we love rubem. >> it was a wonderful night. a
was then the most prosperous town in america. it seemed they embodied american values. they were rich, upstanding citizens her father supported abraham lincoln. they were spiritual and were quakers within new england values of thrift to the point* of stinginess with her father and simplicity and plain living. to the quakers wealth was a sign of virtue and god's blessing so they were very blessed but her father really wanted a son. the first child was a girl. it was hetty. he became enraged and was furious. so much that her mother took to her bet. before she was two years old she was sent to live with her grandfather and her spinster aunt. she really wanted her father's love and do the only way to gain it was to earn it. because her father was an obsessed with money and he said so himself. her grandfather taught her to read the newspapers and the stock and bond places when she was a little girl. at the age of eight she opened her own account at a savings bank in town then sent off to the quaker boarding school taught about thrift, eat whatever is put before you, even if much and then if she did no
>>> making news in america this morning -- travel troubles on this christmas eve. >> millions of travelers are facing delays, and headaches. >>> little time left to get your christmas shopping done, that is. a necessary si for some. way of life for others. the deals are out there waiting. >>> also this morning, the national rifle association is standing firm behind its call for armed guards in every american school. >>> and a stunning decision involving a long-time employee and her boss. she was fired. wait until you hear who is saying it was the right thing to do. >>> and good morning, everybody. happy christmas eve. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm brandi hitt sitting in for paula faris today. >> last minute shoppers in most of the country will have tranquil weather today with a notable exception. we begin with john schriffen. >> reporter: it's the christmas trip turned travel nightmare for drivers on the east and west coast. in northern california, with more snow expected to blanket the mountains, cars are having trouble staying on the roads. >> there's a lot of spinouts. the roa
. for amber waves of grain. for purple mountains majesty above the fruited plane. america america. god shed his grace on thee. and crown thy good. >> our gaggle here was almost unanimous in naming that ad as one of the most memorable and effect of the campaign. that's saying something in a race where nearly a billion dollars was spent just in the presidential race. it's tough to stand out. they're all back with me now. what's interesting now, kevin and stephanie, you both picked that ad as the most effective and both of you on the democratic side and you picked the most effective ad on the republican side. here it is. >> he tried. you tried. it's okay to make a change. >> so. i thought that was interesting. respecting the other's work. kevin, you picked the america the beautiful. what -- >> i remember when that ad came out. previewed on a sunday morning and stephanie and i are both on "face the nation." first time i saw it on air and while it's playing, i'm thinking that's a very good ad. it's oftentimes to use a candidate's words against him. never used the singing against him. and -- >> b
that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also t
by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> we choose to be born or are we fitted into the times we're born into? >>> welcome back to a special holiday edition of "morning joe." >> you're special. >> you should feel very special. >> enjoying your holidays? >> yeah, it great, all that togetherness. thank you for spending part of your morning with us. we're talking lincoln. >> wish the neighbors would leave already. >> are they over there still? >> yeah, they came over. >> do you know their names yet? >> not yet. i never met them. they're from -- hey neighbor. we let them in but -- >> hey, how are you, it's good to see you. then it's like i don't know your name. >> i'm going to buy them all tickets to my favorite movie of the year "lincoln," going to hand it to them on line, get them to unlock it. >> that's a good idea. >> this is a heck of a coincidence. steven spielberg directed film based on doris concerns good win's book "team of rivals," the film turned out to be talk of t capitol hill, and pundits expressing renewed respect for the a
for all of their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrificey and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom is not free. god bless our military families in god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you ,-com,-com ma lisa. thank you mrs. freeman. war brings sorrow and weakness, but through the challengechallenge s we face over the past 10 years, we also got stronger. and seth lynn my classmate who is a proud marine, a scholar from princeton, has gone on to do things in our nation is going to share those words with you and i'm grateful for his mission in the book and his contribution to this effort. [applause] >> the thanks, josh. like just set -- josh said i'm seth lynn director at gw university and our mission is to train veterans, some of the folks who have contributed to this incredible book to continue serving in public office. and it grew out of a nonprofit i started a few years ago called veterans campaign in my chapter in the book is about s
or liberals? conservatives wartime, more money and to more blood. thank you. [applause] john: america has more than 400 billionaires'. i say they are cheap because until recently they did not give a lot to charity. 1997 ted turner promised to donate $1 billion to the wind. united nations? they squandered money. if business tycoons do more for the world than two reinvests of the business creates jobs and wealth for everyone. why is giving away better? >> why not do both? john: i am happy if bill gates gives nothing. >> this is why people don't like newsmen. i know your dirty tricks. there is nothing more to say. good by. i of walking off the set. [laughter] john: it is true that businessmen like ted turner to the right thing. says your on broke from the ayn rand institute. how did they become a billionaire? creating a product service to benefit everybody we know because it pays -- repay for it. we get more value than what we give up. bill gates has improved hundreds of millions of lives he has touched every human being. >> to also employ people that charity keeps on giving. >> you pay employees
heart collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. you did it, daddy. we did it. ♪ every kiss begins with kay is the same frequent heartburn treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hos
telegraph hill of the building complete in phase one and residence for turn-over to the america's cup phase one construction of the building is 80% complete right now and is on schedule for hand over to the america's cup authority on march 2013. phase two, construction drawings are about 95% complete and will be completed shortly. and the port will start phase two construction of the project and it's scheduled for about nine months with substantial completion august 1st 2014 and final completion two months later and this work will clue finishing the remaining ports and including united states customers and u.s. you're border protection facilities and the two forty seven acre northwest plaza sorry -- this is the plaza i i guess most of you know this but this was the rolls of quite a lot of work with -- site and the other work included the north point on the left of the picture the ground transportation area between terminal 21 and 29 and the april between the ship and terminal and the installation of the system, fenders and bull lards and professions of miscellaneous furniture and equipmen
diverse distant portfolios andmary time and businesses in normal america and strategically themary time business goes about organizing and dealing with this customer base is buy dividing it up into eight major categorize based on the operational similar later for each and this way we can pay attention to and provide the services and solutions who have the lime and the same needs and ensure the greater success at the port. among the eight divisions the way that we see the maritime operations for the port is cargo shipping still provides the materials and the cargoing goods that are the life and blood of our civilization, commercial if i can fishings and fish processing bring fresh food and good health to our tables and cruising and fishing provides entertainment and enjoyment for the passengers who board the ship and an attraction destinations around the world. ship ri pair employees hard working hen approximate woman who work on the ships and currently, we are employing at least 220-300 people a day full if i am and as the work increases the ewe often see those head counts go over to
the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states this year, more than any other country in the world. we know that libya is still recovering from an intense period of conflict. there are many courageous libyans who bear the scars of that battle. we are happy we have b
for travelers at the america's train station, bus station and airport. everyone rushing to make their flight. with suitcase full of gifts. >> where are you headed? >> arkansas and then kansas. >> boston. >> oklahoma. >> new york city. >> we're going to california. >> the story was much the day. rain and storms. 100,000 passengers are expected to pass through the atlanta airport today alone. >> it impacted us from departure standpoint. flights have been delayed on each push. throughout the concourses but here in check-in we have been able to get passengers, pretty steadily through. on a regular basis. like any other day. >> snow created havoc for skiers to the west to hit the slopes. some city saw six to 12 inches of fresh powder. northeast and mid-atlantic freezing rainfall has people scrambling to get out, even as they wish for a white christmas. >> looking forward to white christmas. >> we had adequate staffing and got the passengers out quickly. today is a good day. >> triple-a predicts 84 million americans will take to the roads this holiday season. driving 786 miles round trip. >> we ar
, where would it land? did you know there has been a change to america's deportation policy and it is not without controversy. what it could mean for the future of immigration in this country. stay with us. [ male announcer ] wouldn't it be cool if we took the already great sentra apart and completely reimagined it with best-in-class combined mpg, and more interior room than corolla and civic? and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation and other handy stuff? yeahthat would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan sentra. it's our most innovative sentra ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $169-per-month lease on a 2013 nissan sentra. ♪ on a 2013 nissan sentra. let'for an idea.s - a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like lerty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea is
years later, 47. by 1950, it was up to 68. now, the average in america is 78. 76 for men and 81 for women. the numbers will only go up. and up. the. >> their of a book called "100 plus, the coming age of longevity will change everything." everything? >>guest: everything. >> how much longevity? >>guest: i take the premise it will be possible in for average life expectancy to go up to 150. >> there is someone alive today who will live to be 150? >>guest: absolutely. >> is that creepy? you will be shriveled? >>guest: no, we will be healthier for longer, and energetic and enjoying likes. >> because they invent body part replacements. >>guest: that is a low-hanging fruits. scientists have created brand new humoring begans using a person's adult stem cells so bladders, trachea, human blood vessels, they have been created already. >> so, assume we accept this, we are healthy, what happens to your life? you work longer? you change jobs? don't you get sick of it? >>guest: the exiting is, there will be much more opportunity. right now, with the average life span of 80 years, if you want t
sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jessica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the statistical anonymity that always settles over these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but america for
failed to execute in north america in our core business. it was entirely our fault. no excuses. we have made a leadership change and that takes effect starting now. but there were parts of our business that were very strong. we closed ads 6 million deal with the spanish bank. visual analytics were up. there's no question there is strong demand for our products. we failed to execute in certain areas. >> okay. there was one -- i know everyone knows the federal government is having a tough time. they seem to have spent less with you than they did previously. the federal government stiff you? what happened? >> it was bad execution. i can't blame anybody but myself. we had a greater than 90% drop in that business and that's just bad execution. but on the other side we were up 50% in the west. we were you were 50%, 60% in the south and in the northeast. so we had great strength in many areas but areas like the government, the center region, canada, latin america, we had poor execution. >> now, you do some work -- this is the first time i asked you about this. for the oil and gas industry. wha
opportunities because of where they come from. we are aspiring and we are leaving california and america in a new generation. -- leading california and america in a new generation. we have an obligation to lead in the 21st century. we are providing leadership in all areas that govern this country. technology, health, academia, commerce, art, entertainment, and government. today, we must come together, not only in celebration, but an acknowledgment of the work that lies ahead. we understand that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an economy, the best is yet to comment. let me leave you with this last idea. every moment affords us an opportunity to change the world. let's seize that moment in each and every moment that succeeds that moment and let's do that together in celebration of our asian-pacific heritage and recognition of the great heritage as all the people that make up san francisco and california. we will truly honored this month, our
to the country at the age of 20. he had nothing with him. but he had one thing nobody had in america. it was extremely quality which was the knowledge of how to die so. there was no silk industry in this country at that time. they did not know how to make machinery, a diet, have the tools, everything was trial and error to create the silk industry. it was our industrial revolution how we get in on the trade? there's so much money to be made in silk. it is hard to appreciate what it meant to the culture back then. before the age of synthetic fabrics and designers fabric was fashion and silk was the ultimate in style to represent prestige, prosperity, a success. america wanted its own silk industry. skinner would say nobody comes over with and ambition not to wear the silk dress. everybody wanted so. he came to the country with knowledge and was a pioneer in the industry. established its. a founding member of the american soccer association and he took that one in this bill into opportunity after opportunity. to the point* he had his own and silk mill. it was a prosperous an entire vil
has to try to come to work and work through the sickness. and that's not the america that i think of. and so i'm really hoping this week just to finish the answer, the overly-long answer is to, um, really bring more attention to these problems. and right now, this session, congress is going to be debating cuts in the s.n.a.p. program. and in this time of austerity, we can't be dumb and cut things that ultimately provide long-term benefits that are really not -- entitlements, they're really investments in us and our society, and we should begin to prioritize these things federally as well as our actions locally. >> mayor, you were speaking in your forward about the small actions that people took to help your father. we talk in the book quite a bit about the small actions that people take that can help homeless young people. can you talk a little bit about how that works in a city? >> yeah. well, first of all, i've had lots of conversations with people who, quote-unquote, have made it, and when they were in tough times from famous people like tyler perry who was homeless, living in a c
, where do you think that that line falls for the whole of america? >> well, look, i think the deal that's going to emerge is probably some kind of income cut-off of about $500,000. and you're not -- you know, some republicans will vote for that. dagen: steve i apologize. let me interrupt you. i will come back to you. let's listen. wait till the sun shines. ♪ [clapping and cheering] dagen: annual christmas eve tradition at the new york stock exchange, a song written at the turn of the last century and they're still singing it downtown at the corner of wall and broad. steve, we both -- i don't know the lyrics and the world should be thankful for that that i can't even possibly sing that song. but steve, to finish your thought about what you were saying about that income threshold. >> that's a great tradition, by the way. look, what i was saying is i think, you know, they will end up somewhere around 500,000, you know, maybe not exactly that number. and it is going to probably take democratic votes to get that through the house because we've already seen when speaker boehner tried to pas
will get hurt. >> it was a crime that rocked america. >> i started making a list of people and i finally set isled on frank sinatra, jr. >> in 1963, hollywood star his kidnapped son.o savee >> he was defeated for the first time. >> also on the battlefield and the home front. >> they are bred for work and kept for work. >> how does man's best friend become a superdog. >> the longer you are with a dog the more he wants to work for you. >> and see this act. >> hello, forest. >> in his most important role. >> you are the providers of our freedom and we don't take that for granted. >> gary i sinise helping true american heros. >> i'm allison camerota. >> i'm dana perino. >> i'm claudia cowen and that is all next on "fox files." ♪ call me irresponsible ." >> in the fall of 1963, sinatra was on top of the world. the lead ever of the glamorous rat pack which featured the likes of dean martin and sammy davis, jr. his latest hit on the charts was "call me irresponsible" and his movies were still doing big business at the box office. he was in the middle of filming another rat pack movie robin an
a couple of records that got great reviews but bombed. well, they didn't sell in america, but in south africa, for some reason, rodriguez was bigger than elvis or the beatles. but rodriguez didn't know a thing about it. unbelievable, right? well, just wait until you hear the rest of his story. >> stahl: you're a role model and you know it. >> i think it's my responsibility to know it. well, good evening, los angeles! ( cheers and applause ) >> stahl: taylor swift is a role model to millions of fans who pack into arenas all over the world to hear the 22-year-old sing songs she writes herself. >> ♪ every little thing... >> stahl: her shows are extravaganzas, and we were allowed backstage to watch taylor run in and out of quick- change rooms, getting ready to hit the stage. ( cheers and applause ) i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 t
fine jewelry. one more reason kay is the number-one jewelry store in america. it's... a work of art? ♪ every kiss begins with kay ian: torningts 60's minutes. ayodele, taylor swift, follow bid "blood bloods," "the good wife" and "the mentalist," only cbs. matt prater is on for a 41-yard field goal attempt. colquitt will hold it. aaron brewer the snapper. denver came in number two in the nfl. 29.2 points per game. they have 34 after the field goal by prater with 1:55 left to play. let me apologize before we even do this to those in cleveland. this is not my idea. dan: it's not mine either, i guess. ian: flashback. the browns and the broncos. john elway. 98-yard touchdown drive, took 5:02, the pass to marc jackson ties the game and forces o.t. they'd win it. and then 1987 a.f.c. championship. ernest byner stripped of the ball. the broncos recovered and held on. defensive it was his idea to show that. that's whose idea it was. it was elway's idea. ian: all right, we'll go with that. please all your tweets and emails derricked to bob man back from cbs sports. dan: i have his address -
even if you say, well, i don't think gun control laws should be put into place in america. >> if i told you it was tough politics, would you be shocked? that that's the reason why. but in all fairness, i think that the political realities and the fact it is politically tough, despite what happened in newtown for a lot of politicians to do anything to anger the gun rights enthusiasts. and we're talking about, as you reported, a 4 million member organization, it's tough for them to do that. i think also, everybody is just trying to kind of work through what could be possible legislatively, and for those who are in politically perilous situations, there's no benefit in them jumping on a piece of legislation before they really take the time and see what they may or may not have to vote on. >> dana bash reporting live from washington. >>> if you were watching the nra's announcement on friday, you could not help but see this. >> the nra has blood on its hands. shame on the nra. ban assault weapons now. >> that was medea benjamin. she was the second protester to disrupt the meeting. she's co-d
the markets and how they've been reacting and wall street and corporate america more generally. is there new pessimism that we're, a, not going to get a deal and not solve the issue anyway? >> big disappointment. people outside of washington understand clearly. a couple hundred billion over ten years separating both sides. the question becomes can washington still govern itself? two, there's a realization we're in the middle of a small recovery. if we find ourselves not able to resolve this moment, it retards and slows and undermines what we see ourselves doing going forward. finally, for the life of me as someone who sfrd there, it was so distressful to watch both sides yell at each other. i feel sorry for speaker boehner. i've seen sop of your colleagues who are a little unreasonable and i dare say some democrats who are unraeasonable. what does it take to make them come together if they can't come together at this moment as close as they are. >> durable goods is up, the housing market is beginning to come back. the market is poised. but the stock market is going to react. i can't previous
states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. sir, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the us us house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on december 21, 2012, at 4:04 p.m. that the senate agreed to the conference report accompanying the bill, h.r. 4310. with best wishes i am signed sincerely, karen l. haas. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, when the house adjourns today it shall adjourn to meet at 20:00 p.m. on thursday, december 27, 2012. without objection, the committees may have until the end of the second session to file the final report pursuant to clause 1-b of rule 11, and the chair of the committee in consultation with its ranking ranking member before filing such report may update report to reflect committee or house action taken after the report was ordered reported o
in america. estimates are that would cost some where not the neighborhood of $8 billion a year. a couple of questions. one, would you vote at a time of deficit issues for $8 billion a year to put armed guards in every school in america? and are there any laws you can support in terms of assault guns, or assault rifles in terms of high capacity magazines, tightening background checks, any new gun controls you could support? >> letts step back for a second. i'm a doctor and father of three and from wyoming, a state where we believe strongly in our second amendment rights. we are the people of wyoming and we personally still absolutely committed to find real solutions that work. so something like this tragedy never happens again. three more of those children were laid to rest yesterday. >> chris: i'm asking the specific question, sir. >> very, very, very hurtful to all of us in this country. i think decisions about schools ought to be made at the local level. i would not want a national effort to say you have is to do this at schools. i think local education made at thee best plaid at the l
keeping america safe. they don't actually come here with a circle the helicopters and then drive to the ranch areas feeding on the summer in their role county. one day they build taller fence and hire more agents and make it impossible to drive north without going to the border patrol agent check ports with dogs. nothing stops the flow of cubans going north. for years i walked mountains, the mountains and have taken note of your and try to differentiate between the mountain lion skat and the wildcat mines along the trail with a detailed and drilling down the hill. i think of all of the souls that what the mountains at night and the ones that scratched the hole in the mountain hoping to make small fortunes. some did but most did not and most of them died early. all this heavy-metal might be easier to forget if i hadn't heard heard the rumors that they would reopen the mine which would effectively alter the economic and cultural landscape of the town. this makes me realize i have a lot to learn about how the mining companies attacked the town and surplus proximity to their operatio
, right history of strom thurmond's america, in a way that would in a critical but dispassionate way, a way that would shed light on some of the issues that have shaped each of our own america's today. and i hope that in doing so you can add, a measure of reason and passion to these issues that embroil our politics today, and that divide us so. so that was the goal. that's the mission as it were, but what are the big issues? one of the issues that a history of strom thurmond's americaspeaks to? we remember, a lot of us remember who strom thurmond was. strom thurmond was a 1948 presidential candidate. strom thurmond was one of the lead authors of the 1956 southern manifesto. this is the protest the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that.
to go into the bleakest time of america's history, the truly-- the biggest sin that the country committed and the sin that we're still paying for to this day, we haven't gotten past the sin. part of the reason we haven't gotten past it is we have to almost lie about it, lie by omission. and i wanted to throw out there on the table. i wanted to take a modern-day audience and stick them in the antebellum south and see what america america was like at that time in that part country. and deal-- now, i want to do it in an entering way, and me the way to do that is to do it as a genre pies because it seems like most of the time-- whenever it has been dealt with, at least in the last 30 years or 40 years, it's been either historical with a capital "h" which i think kind of put it at an arm's distance, kinds of puts it a little bit under class, to observe and here are the facts. and we all know the facts, more or less, or there's been movies like, "mandingo" or "good-bye uncle tom" which in many ways i think are much clorls to the truth than the capital "h"movies. so i wanted to do it l
coverage? same coverage on america's best networks. you saved $146.76 by switching to straight talk. awesome! now you can afford to share your allowance with me. get the season's hottest smartphones like the samsung galaxy s2 and get straight talk with unlimited data for just $45 a month -- from america's gift headquarters. walmart. ♪ >>> since we announced we were going to have the nra's wayne lapierre on the program, we received so much feedback on line, thougs of you september us tweets and comments on our facebook page, more than 40,000 saw this post alone. we'll continue to monitor that conversation online. tell us what you thought on the interview at facebook.com/meetthepress or on twitter #mtp. in the meantime, we're going to find out what these two gentlemen thought when we come back, senators chuck schumer and lindsey graham with reaction right after this short break. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price
states of america. amen. >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable joseph crowley, representative of the seventh district of new york. >> thank you speaker and reverend conroy. thank you to all of my colleagues here today as well as the distinguished senators here with us. mrs. bush and madam secretary, our thanks and appreciation to both of you for not only taking the time to be here today, but for your many contributions to this effort and for your commitment to advancing the cause of freedom and democracy in burma. i would be remiss if i did not also mentioned someone who is not with us here today and that is congressman tom lantos. he and his staff worked so hard on burma for so many years. i wish you were here today to share this moment in history with us. today is an amazing day. today is an incredible day. who would have thought that when this bill was introduced in the house in 2008, when aung san suu kyi was still under house arrest, that in a few short years she would be standing or sitting here with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor, and as a member o
would it land? and did you know that, there's been a change to america's deportation policy and it's not without controversy. what it could mean for the future of immigration in this country. stay with us. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax worksdifferently than other laxatives. it dws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to fe great. miralax. military families face, we understan at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is
of thousands of young families around the country, here in america, who want to adopt. they know how difficult it is, and i have a website inho inhofe.senator.gov. and many young people in africa, particularly, if some of them aren't adopted, they don't live. it's a process, a beautiful process and it's a rewarding one. anyone watching us now who has ever considered an adoption, particularly an adoption from africa, it's an experience you'll never have any other way and you will be richly rewarded for it. >> thank you, senator jim inhofe and marie, god bless you and have a wonderful, wonderful christmas. [applause] >> senator inhofe is going to join us on next week's show talking about the problems that president obama's environmental regulations could cause for businesses in 2013. up next, we catch up with former iraq war p.o.w. jessica lynch. we'll find out how she's doing and what she's up to almost ten years since her dramatic rescue by fellow troops. [applause] fellow troops. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff y
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